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GeekDesk Review: The Right Posture for a Producer

As a professional producer, or even an amateur one, how many hours per day do you sit at a desk? Out of that time, how often are your hands angled awkwardly at a keyboard, your back hunched, or your neck strained to reach the right angle?

It’s no secret that poor posture has potential to create health problems, especially for the neck and spine, and reduce productivity. As a result, offices, especially in creative fields, have opted for standing or “treadmill” desks in recent years. So if a nine-to-five office drone receives multiple benefits from standing, what’s to keep a producer out – especially when you do 12- to 16-hour days in a studio?

GeekDesk has led the pack of adjustable, stand-or-sit desks. The brand currently has two basic types, each with large and small sizes and a choice of black and silver colors.

The GeekDesk Max offers greater lifting capabilities, supporting up to 335 pounds, and has more adjustment options. Specifically, the sturdy steel frame not only moves from heights of 23 to 49 inches, at 18 to 20mm per second, but offers four programmable height presets, an LED display, and arrow keys. Dual, synchronized motors power a lift mechanism that doesn’t make much noise, and for long-term use, the polymer-coated finish resists scuffs and scratches.

The next model down, the GeekDesk V3, shares several of these characteristics, but with a few differences. Although it travels the same distance, it supports 275 pounds and travels at 28 to 35mm per second. And even though it shares the same three-section leg adjustable design, there are no presets.

In addition to these aspects, both have desktops that are 39.4 or 55.1 inches wide.

If you’ve been used to sitting all day, standing may appear to put stress on your joints at first, but over time, users have said to experience less back and neck pain, feel more focused (a must when you’ve got to put out a track), and get more done. GeekDesk’s two products essentially provide these assets and meet ANSI/BIFMA standards at an affordable price.

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With the market for treadmill desks growing, what makes GeekDesk’s systems stand out? For one, they’re continually ahead with the amount of pounds supported. For a producer, particularly one looking to have a computer and older analog equipment on a desktop, 275 or 335 pounds means, really, everything you own can stay in place on top.

Two, the amount supported isn’t just one asset. Each desk can hold the full poundage on top and adjust in either direction, without your items moving around or, worse, falling off. Want to sit down for a bit? Simply use the controls to move it all down a foot. And, with the presets, that “perfect” angle is easily referenced for the future.

Each desk further offers three cable holes with a cover, and has a built-in routing system to ensure everything remains in order. If you regularly keep multiple corded devices on your desk, this aspect means better organization and fewer ruined cables with time.

Additionally, finding that perfect ergonomic design is possible. Rather than adjusting your body, or elevating a monitor or padding a chair, you, really, just have to raise or adjust the frame until your arms are exactly parallel to the floor and bent at a 90-degree angle – ideal for long-term, daily keyboard usage.

Still, even with these factors, GeekDesk has a few downsides. For one, the brand hasn’t attempted to add features or capabilities to keep up with competition, including similar boutique products, so it appears very basic – great for the price, yes, but ultimately your standard model.

Along this line, installation tends to take more time. On average, expect to spend an hour putting the system together with help. The top, as well, has no holes, so unless you plan to screw all fasteners into the surface, be prepared to have a spare drill on hand.

As well, many who’ve looked to purchase a GeekDesk find that the company’s website regularly has a backlog of over a month for orders. You might be lucky and find something available, but be prepared to wait.

Ultimately, if you’re looking to improve your DAW and studio space, the GeekDesk makes a decent long-term investment for keeping your posture, health, and productivity in good shape.

By | 2016-12-02T14:44:38+00:00 May 16, 2014|Reviews, Studio Gear|0 Comments