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Stanton SCS.4DJ Review

The Stanton SCS.4DJ is designed to provide an option for DJs that doesn’t require them to take their laptop to every show. The device is well-built and has some very interesting features integrated into it that make controlling your mixes a breeze. It does have some lacking elements where supported formats are concerned, however, particularly for those who prefer to use the open-source FLAC format.

The Basics

The Stanton SCS.4DJ is an attractive package. The screen up top allows you to beat match by waveform and to perform numerous other functions. The display is clear and easy to read and trying to use it in clubs shouldn’t give you any trouble at all. The Stanton SCS.4DJ is also provided with two scratch pads, both of which have excellent response. These also function as controllers, so you’ll be using these to search for music and perform other functions on the device.

The Stanton SCS.4DJ specifications include:

  • < -112 dBU equivalent input noise
  • 14 dBu sensitivity at clip
  • Frequency Response: 20Hz-20kHz +/- 2db, +/-0.25dB 100Hz to 15kHz
  • 24-bit, 44.1 kHz sampling

The features include:

  • Compatibility with most mass storage devices
  • Browse, sort and search capabilities that are fast and easy
  • 8x soft buttons

The device is small and easy to transport, weighing only 5 pounds.

Functionality

The Stanton SCS.4DJ does make it possible to head off to a gig without your laptop in tow. This is one of the primary purposes of this device and, in that regard, it is designed very well. There is enough space underneath the device for you to stash your portable hard drive, making it safer to keep your storage device on the table while you work. The device is provided with 2 USB connections accessible from the underside of the device, so there shouldn’t be any problems with hooking up your mass storage device. Plus there are two more USB ports on the top and rear panel.

The Stanton SCS.4DJ has a feature that’s usually found in more expensive devices: complete EQ kill. This allows you to kill sound using the EQ only, a great feature.

The effects include filters, flanges and an effect called slice, which provides a great effect that your audiences won’t have heard from every DJ before.

Searching is easy and the large LED screen ensures that you won’t have to strain your eyes to see your results. This is another feature that makes carrying your laptop around completely unnecessary. The USB inputs can accommodate keyboards, so you can add the easiest of all human interface devices to this particular rig, for searching and playback controls if you so choose. This makes the Stanton SCS.4DJ very easy to operate, even for beginners who are just getting started with equipment.

The Stanton SCS.4DJ supports MP3, MP4 (Audio), WAV, AAC and AIFF formats, but it does not support FLAC, which may be a problem for some DJs.

Bottom Line

Overall, this is a quality product that should suit those DJs who want to dispense with the laptop and simplify their rigs. The fact that you can stash your mass storage device underneath the Stanton SCS.4DJ and still have access to it is a great feature that makes everything even more self contained. The four USB inputs provide you with plenty of space for human interface devices, which will be welcome news for those who want something that they can work with as easily as they could their laptop.

The lack of support for FLAC files may be an issue for some DJs that depend upon this open-source format for their music, but those who use Apple formats will be glad to see that the company’s formats are supported by the Stanton SCS.4DJ

The Stanton SCS.4DJ is easy to use and, because of that, it would make a good choice for someone who wants to get started as a DJ with a very simple device that allows them all the power that they’ll need. Professional DJs will likely appreciate no longer having to haul their laptop—and all of the potentially sensitive personal information on it—from club to club.

Most DJs should find a place for the Stanton SCS.4DJ among their equipment. Those who are starting out will likely find that this provides them with the only device that they’ll need for quite a long time and that it has more than enough flexibility and power to grow with them.

By | 2016-12-02T15:19:43+00:00 March 26, 2012|Reviews|5 Comments
  • Rod

    How in the world did u guys make a controller that has the most limitations on the #1 controller in the world, THE DJ??? To be specific the scs.4dj, i was thrown back to day1 of my first cd controller where I couldn’t believe there’s no back/forward button for the player itself… R u kidN me? I gotta play with a cue button when i wanna simply start a song over? Even when the cue is set to the start of the track, once its moved during a song, THATS IT? R u serious? I can’t even get back to the beginning of a song w/o reloading the track or spinning the wheel endlessly til im there… The browse is almost usless because it resets itself to the start of the list w/o me resetting it. Whats that all about? U mean to tell me, i gotta scroll thru 40g of music every damn time i wanna find a song or use that God awful search system… I hate to down u so hard, but i’m thoroughly dissappointed in Stanton for this one… I feel like u downgraded to Numark status on this one… Bad Stanton, BAD! If i had a ruler, i would call my 1st grade teacher to pass out the spankings… and the upgrade software is still slow as hell… Dont u guys watch DJs to see how fast we move? Back to Serato…